NAVIGATION






Mrs. Tait's & Mrs. Fleischhauer's Class


Grade 4 - Room 202

General Information



Reading

- Balanced Literacy Approach – 6 Comprehension Strategies: Prediction and Prior Knowledge, Visualization, Questioning, Think Aloud, Text Features and Structures, and Summarization.

- A typical reading lesson may begin with a short “mini-lesson” to teach or reinforce a skill or concept, followed by independent reading, guided reading, shared reading, and/or group or individual assignments. (Lessons are conducted as a whole class or in small groups, depending on the desired learning outcomes and individual learning needs of students.)

- Each day we make time for silent independent reading.  Students can read a book of their choice.  I encourage them to try to read a variety of genres and to find a “just right” book appropriate for their current individual reading level.  Students will be reading books and periodicals from our classroom library and school library.

- Reading often helps build important skills for fluency:  When a fluent reader reads aloud, it sounds as if he or she is speaking.  The reading is fluid and accurate, with adequate speed, appropriate phrasing and correct intonation.

- A skilled reader is accurate, fluent, and has deep comprehension.

Comprehension means making constructive meaning of what you read.  We will practice using the 6 Comprehension Strategies.

- Understanding the structure of the text helps children as readers.  Is the text procedural, narrative, a persuasive argument, explanation, essay, or report?  Familiarity with text also makes one a better writer.

- Each child should have a book to read for at least 15-20 minutes every evening.  He or she can read alone, or with someone – novels, newspapers, manuals, poetry…everything counts! 

 

Writing/ELA

- Students will continue to practice using the writing process (prewriting, drafting, revising, editing, publishing) during our Writers’ Workshop and work to develop their sense of “voice” as writers. 

- We’ll review parts of speech (nouns, verbs, adjectives, etc.), sentence and paragraph structure, editing resources (dictionary, thesaurus, Writer’s folder checklists, etc.).

- Students will have opportunities to write in a variety of genres, and for a variety of purposes (to entertain, persuade, inform, etc.).

- A typical Writers’ Workshop may begin with a short “mini-lesson” to teach or reinforce a skill or concept, followed by independent writing, guided writing, shared writing, and/or group or individual assignments. (Lessons are conducted as a whole class or in small groups, depending on the desired learning outcomes and individual learning needs of students.)

- The more they write, the better their writing will become.  Encourage your child to write at home (journals, letters, shopping lists, etc.).

 

Related Links

New York State P-12 Common Core Learning Standards for English Language Arts & Literacy
New York State Testing Program Grade 4 Common Core English Language Arts Test
Reading Planet
The Stacks for Kids: Scholastic.com

Idiom Game 1

Idiom Game 2

Common Idioms and Meanings 1

Common Idioms and Meanings 2

 


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